Making "Buachaill Mór"

"Buachaill Mór"

 

I'm making a "Buachaill Mór" for Martin Robertson as part of a deal to help further the career of a Scouse Bard. It will have a Caucasian Spruce top and Old Cuban Mahogany back and sides reclaimed from a Georgian drop leaf table.

 

Last updated 23/2/2020.

 

The Cuban Mahogany rosette ring and black/ pear/ black outer purfling are test fitted and glued in using white pva glue.

 


Cunning plans.


Here's the Georgian drop leaf table.


Here's the back and sides set.


The Cuban Mahogany sides are thicknessed.


The bass side will have a "porthole" soundport just up from the waist on the lower bout. The hole is drilled with a 40mm Forstner bit.


The sides are then bent in the Fox-style bender using a heating blanket. The cutaway is bent on the hot pipe.


Here are the bent sides are in the mould.


The Rio Rosewood back plate and porthole insert are glued together using hot hide glue.


The porthole is then drilled out using a 32mm Forstner bit.


The completed porthole is then glued into the bass side using fish glue.


The Mahogany neck block is drilled for the bolt holes. The side of the neck block that joins the cutaway has been shaped to fit the side.


Next the holes for the 6mm carbon fibre flying buttress rods are drilled.


The slot for the fingerboard extension support is cut and the fingerboard support is then fitted and glued in using hot hide glue.


Two Rio Rosewood strips matching the binding are glued to the front and edge of the treble side of the neck block. The neck block is then glued to the cutaway side together with a black/ pear/ black purfling strip in between the side and Old Rio Rosewood strip using fish glue.


The Rio Rosewood end graft is glued to the Mahogany tailblock using hot hide glue.


The treble side is then glued to the tail-block with a black/ pear/ black purfling strip in between the side and end graft using fish glue.


The bass side is then glued to the neck block using fish glue.


The bass side is then glued to the tail-block with a black/ pear/ black purfling strip in between the side and end graft using fish glue.


Here's the rim-set in the mould.


The sides are profiled for the back's curvature and to build in the "wedge" that makes the sides narrower on the bass side. The Mahogany reverse-kerfed linings are then glued in using fish glue.


The sides are profiled for the top's curvature and the linings are glued in using fish glue.


The mahogany side braces are notched into the linings and glued in using hot hide glue.


The 6mm carbon fibre rod flying-buttress braces are then glued in.


Here's the completed rim-set.


The Cuban Mahogany back plates are initially thicknessed, jointed and glued using hot hide glue and the tent method.


The European spruce X braces are profiled to a 10' radius, notched and then glued on one at a time.


Here's the second one being glued.


Then the bottom ladder brace is glued on . . .


. . . followed by the top one.


The Cuban Mahogany X brace cap is glued on using fish glue.


The back braces are then carved and the back is "voiced" - here's the result.


The linings are notched to accept the brace ends and the back is glued to the rim-set using fish glue.


The Caucasian Spruce top plates are initially thicknessed, jointed and glued using hot hide glue and the tent method.


The soundhole is going to be "bound" with Cuban Mahogany. Firstly a Cuban Mahogany soundhole patch is cut to shape and glued on using hot hide glue and a caul.


Then the rosette is routed out.


Here's the result.


Then a rosette channel is cut in the top down to the soundhole patch.


The Cuban Mahogany rosette ring and black/ pear/ black outer purfling are test fitted and glued in using white pva glue.


Next a step is routed in the inner edge of the rosette and then the soundhole is routed out. This gives the look of a totally bound soundhole and the fingerboard edge will finish at the beginning of the step to give a complete Mahogany ring around the inner edge of the soundhole.


Here's the result.


The top is then cut close to the final shape.


The European Spruce A frame braces are glued on using hot hide glue.


The European Spruce upper transverse brace is profiled to a 13' radius and glued on using hot hide glue after notching to span the A frame braces.


The European Spruce X braces are profiled to a 13' radius, notched and then glued on one at a time using hot hide glue.


Here's the second one being glued.


Next the Rio Rosewood bridge-plate is glued on using hot hide glue and a caul in the go-bar deck.


The spruce X brace cap is glued on.


The brace behind the bridge-plate is then glued on.


Then the first tone bar is glued on . . .


. . . followed by the second split brace.


The bass side finger braces are then glued on . . .


. . . followed by the treble side ones.


The braces are carved and the top “voiced”. Then the top is signed and dated.


Here’s the “voiced” top.


The Cuban Mahogany back strips are glued on using hot hide glue.


The linings are notched to accept the brace ends and the top is glued to the rim-set using fish glue.